Is An MBA From The US Still Worth It?

Soojin Kwon, managing director of full-time MBA admissions at the University of Michigan Ross School of Business, answers your Applicant Question of the Week

It's time for another Applicant Question of the Week at BusinessBecause!

Every week, we give you the opportunity to ask one of our chosen admissions experts anything you want to know about getting into business school. One question each week is chosen for our expert to answer.

This week, our question comes from an anonymous BusinessBecause reader who has some worries about applying to US business schools.

Their question is answered by Soojin Kwon, managing director of full-time MBA programs and admissions at the University of Michigan Ross School of Business.


Applicant Question of the Week:

Dear BusinessBecause,

I'm an applicant from France looking to do an MBA in either Europe or the US. I was wondering if an MBA from the US is still worth it, considering the quality of schools in Europe now? 


The Answer:

Getting an MBA in the US is definitely worth it for three main reasons:

1. Changing career

If you are interested in making a career change—either at the function or industry level—a two-year, US-based MBA program will provide you with broader career options.

Students in US-based MBA programs typically do an internship the summer between their first and second year, allowing them to work in and experience a target company, function, or industry before committing to a full-time job.

In addition, at many US business schools, MBAs spend some of their first or second year taking part in a full-time consulting project—so they’re getting hands-on experience in a real organization, not just discussing cases, for sometimes over a month. Many international students select their project to get experience working for a US-based company like Amazon, Microsoft and Uber.

2. Deepening focus

A two-year MBA program will enable you to go deeper into your area of academic and professional interest. It will also give you a broader array of electives from which to choose.

Some MBA programs enable you to take classes at other graduate schools within the broader university. You could take classes in engineering, law, public health, and many others. At some schools, you can even earn another masters degree while earning your MBA.

3. Developing soft skills

Finally, the breadth and intensity of co-curricular and club activities that you will engage in over the two years will help develop your leadership skills and enable you to forge deeper relationships with classmates than a one-year program can.

Deeper relationships mean longer lasting bonds. And the alumni network component cannot be underestimated. It can be one of the most important professional resources throughout your career.

The broader career options, deeper learning, opportunities for leadership development, and stronger relationships make the time and investment in a two year, US-based full-time MBA entirely worth it.


Ask an Admissions Expert a Question!

Next week, you'll have the opportunity to ask John White, executive director of enrollment for business master's programs at Wake Forest University School of Business. webp.net-resizeimage-9_2.jpg

John has been at Wake Forest since 2013, and now handles admissions to the Master's programs in Accounting, Business Analytics, and Management—so he knows exactly what the school is looking for in their applicants.

Are you looking for help with your Master's application, or curious about Wake Forest's business master's programs? Send your questions to us!

Submit your question on our TwitterFacebook, or LinkedIn pages, send us an email to info@businessbecause.com, or simply post a comment below! 

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