Consulting And Finance Named Among 'Most Boring' Jobs

Survey finds almost two-thirds of MBA-level CEOs are bored in their jobs

If you're a MBA grad working at a consultancy or financial institution reading this whilst bored at work, take heart: you're not alone.

According to salary benchmarking site Emolument.com, more than two-thirds of employees in MBA-heavy industries like consulting, financial services and banking experience workplace boredom. In total, the study examined boredom in 14 different industries. 

When looking at various employee levels, the survey also found “surprisingly little difference in boredom levels” between junior workers and CEOs.

Two-thirds of entry-level employees say they’re bored on the job, while 65% of high-level executives reported work-related boredom. 78% of respondents in project management said they were uninspired at work. 

“CEOs struggle to enthuse their teams […] probably due to being tangled in administrative and managerial processes which frustrate their desire to implement a vision and lead their business,” says Alice Leguay, co-founder and COO at Emolument.

Alice adds this is a particularly crucial problem for more traditional businesses in law or accountancy that employ young workers. Because these companies are commonly perceived to be “dull,” it can be harder for executives to get through to junior employees.

“Without an inspirational leadership figure, or an exciting professional challenge to motivate younger team members, boredom will quickly settle in,” she says.

Not every job in the survey of 1,300 professionals was filled with bored workers, however. Less than half of respondents employed in research and development jobs said they were dispirited in the office.

Switzerland is home to the most motivated workers, with Emolument’s figures showing 51% of respondents in the country saying they were bored at work. While in Italy and the United Arab Emirates, 83% of employees said they found their jobs boring.

Emolument analysis shows boredom in UAE workers could be chalked up to a blasé attitude brought upon by “very high salaries.” 

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